Everything You Need to Get Started with Colored Pencils

Today continues a series of articles on colored pencil basics for those who are either new to colored pencils, or want to try them. Today, we’ll talk about the things you need to get started with colored pencils.

Since this is an article on the basics, I want to keep it simple. But I also I want to answer a few common questions asked by people considering colored pencils.

If that’s you, read on!

Why Colored Pencils?

With so many great mediums available, why should you consider colored pencils?

Reasons are a varied as the artists who use them. I dedicated an entire posts to why I like them and you can read it here.

For the sake of this post, I’ll share the most important reasons I prefer colored pencils.

  1. They’re great for creating detail.
  2. They’re clean. No messy cleanup. No migrating paint.
  3. You can take them anywhere!

Those are the three main reasons I started using colored pencils back in the mid 1990s. I needed a medium I portable medium ideal for producing the same, highly detailed portraits I was doing with oils.

Of course there are all the great colors, ease of use, all the ways you can blend with them, and all the great brands available. If you give them a try, I’m sure you’ll find your own reasons to love colored pencils.

What You Need to Get Started with Colored Pencils

Okay. So I’ve convinced you that you are on the right track in considering colored pencils. Now for the big question. Just what must you have to get started?

But the artists you read about and whose work you admire talk about so many different pencils, tools, accessories, and methods, you can’t help but wonder:

I confess. I’m guilty of the same kind of talk. There are just so many really cool things available!

What do you really need to get started?

Everything You Need to Get Started with Colored Pencils

I was once right where you are now. Wanting to try colored pencils but not sure how to start.

Or what to buy or how much of it.

One of my goals with this blog and with every post is to help artists at all levels avoid some of the mistakes I’ve made. That includes clearing up some of the confusion about basic supplies.

Lets begin with three very simple lists.

I have a basic list, an expanded basic list, and an Everything & The Kitchen Sink List. There are so many useful, fun, and cool things on my to-be-purchased list, that this method is the best way I’ve found to prioritize purchases.

This post covers the first two lists because, quite frankly, I could make two or three posts just on the third list, and still not mention everything.

The Basic List contains the minimum amount of supplies necessary to get started with colored pencils. It is the most simple list, and the least expensive.

In most cases, you can find these items locally. No shipping or handling! If you’ve never tried colored pencils before and you’re not sure how you’ll like them, this is the list for you.

The Expanded Basic List is the Basic List plus a few additional items, as well as different types of some of the same items. Two kinds of paper, for example.

You may still be able to find many of the materials and supplies locally, but you will also probably have to do more searching. Online shopping will generally produce better prices and less footwork. If you’re serious about getting started with colored pencil—and sticking with it—this is your list.

If you want to start with the basic list, then add a few items from the other two lists after you’ve used colored pencils for a while, that’s perfect.

One Additional Word of Advice

It’s advisable to buy the best tools you can afford. A few artist quality pencils give you a better feel for the medium than a large set of student grade pencils. The higher quality pencils usually have less filler and a higher ratio of pigment to binder than less expensive pencils. That makes them easier to use and learn with.

You can buy less expensive pencils, if you wish. That’s how I started. But I wasn’t aware of the differences and soon found that cheap wasn’t always less expensive.

NOTE: I realize that not all of my readers are in the United States. If you are not and cannot get some of these supplies, substitute whatever is available where you live.

Now on to the lists!

The Basic List

Paper

I warned you the list was basic!

But paper can be confusing enough on its own, so here are some ideas to get you started.

One 9×12 pad of Rising Stonehenge paper, either white or toned. I recommend white. It’s easier to see what your pencils can do on white paper.

If you can’t get Rising Stonehenge, get a good, basic drawing paper like Strathmore 400 series paper.

Pencils

One 24-pencil set of Prismacolor Premier Soft Core pencils. This set has the basic colors (reds, blues, greens, yellows, black, and white) with enough variety to let you experiment, without burdening you with colors you may not use or unnecessary expense.

And not all of those.

NOTE: Roughly half the colors in the Prismacolor line are not lightfast, meaning they will fade over time or if exposed to direct sunlight. I’ve put together a list of the colors that are top-rated for lightfastness. If you can buy pencils individually and if you’re interested in making fine art, take this list with you when you shop.

Other Tools

Sharpener

A pencil sharpener is a must. A simple, hand-held sharpener is all you need to sharpen pencils. Prismacolor makes a very nice one for a few dollars, but you can also get them anywhere school supplies are sold.

A mechanical pencil sharpener gives you better sharpening with Prismacolor pencils, but I have also used hand-held sharpeners with good results.

The Kum sharpeners are a good value. The Kum wedge sharpener is made with two openings, one for standard size pencils, and one for larger pencils. It’s high quality and inexpensive, though you will probably have to buy it on-line.

Eraser

There are a number of good erasers available for colored pencil work, but I recommend getting a good click eraser, such as shown below. They are a pencil-like tool into which you can insert the eraser. They’re great for fine detail erasing as well as general erasing. The Pentel Clic Eraser is the one I use.

Everything You Need to Get Started with Colored Pencils - Click Erasers

Note: All of these items can be purchased locally most of the time. I can buy them all with a single trip to Hobby Lobby. If there’s an art store, office supply store, or university near where you live, you can probably find them all there.

The Expanded Basic List

These are tools you can add to the previous list or, in some cases, replace similar items on the previous list.

Paper

A pad of Bristol. Bristol paper is heavier than Rising Stonehenge. It’s available in two finishes: Vellum and Regular (or smooth). Regular surface is very smooth. The vellum finish is a little softer, but still not as soft as Stonehenge.

I’ve used both Bienfang and Strathmore. Both are good papers, but they’re so smooth, they don’t work well for my drawing methods. They are ideal for learning, though, and are the go-to papers for a lot of colored pencil artists.

You can also add larger pads of paper. Or smaller, whatever is your preference.

For a paper with more tooth, try a pad of Canson Mi-Tientes. They come in pads of assorted colors, earth tone colors, and grays. I’d suggest a pad of assorted colors, which includes white.

Pencils

Replace the 24-pencil set of Prismacolor Premier pencils with a 36-pencil or 48-pencil set of Prismacolor Premier pencils OR a small set of some other brand, such as Faber-Castell Polychromos, Lyra Rembrandt Polycolor or Caran d’Ache Luminance. Be prepared to pay more for these, but better performance and more lightfast colors are worth the expense.

A colorless blender is also a handy tool to have. A colorless blender is essentially a colored pencil without pigment. It’s made with the same wax binder the colored pencils are and it’s used to blend colors. Use it just like a regular colored pencil to blend without adding additional color.

Get Started with Colored Pencils - Colorless Blender

Other Tools

Sharpener

Get a good, low cost electric sharpener instead of a hand-held sharpener. They’re usually available starting at around $30.

Erasers

One package of mounting putty. Look for Hand-Tak, Poster-Tack, Blu-Tack or similar. Handi-Tak or similar brands. Mounting putty is a soft, moldable substance most commonly used to hang posters. Tear off a piece, shape it however you want, stick it to the back of a poster and press the poster against the wall.

But it’s also very useful in lifting color from a drawing. You can make it whatever shape you need to lift color. It’s also self-cleaning. Work it in your fingers and the color disappears!

Brush

A large brush is handy for sweeping away eraser crumbs. You can use your hand, but doing so runs the risk of accidentally marking your drawing. You can also blow the crumbs away, but a brush is easier to use. Look for  a large brush with soft bristles. Drafting brushes are ideal.

Everything You Need to Get Started with Colored Pencils - Drafting Brush & Erasing Shield

Erasing Shield

This is a handy template—usually very thin metal—with a variety of standard shapes cut into it. To use it, lay it over your drawing and erase through one of the openings. The result will be that shape on your drawing.

You can also add color using an erasing shield.

A Note on Solvents

You’ll notice I didn’t mention solvents. That’s because there’s enough to be said about them that they require their own post. You can, of course, use solvents with colored pencils. Many of us do. I do, in limited form.

Solvents are liquid tools that allow you to blend colored pencil. Standard solvents are odorless paint thinner, turpentine, rubber cement thinner, and rubbing alcohol. They can speed the drawing process, but you also need to use them with care.

That’s why I don’t include them on the Basic List or the Expanded Basic List. Better to find out first if you like drawing with colored pencils enough to invest in additional tools.

Are you ready to get started with colored pencils?

I’ve put together a PDF download shopping list that includes all three of my shopping categories.

Click Here to Download Your Own Everything You Need to Get Started with Colored Pencils Shopping Lists

Click here to get my Everything You Need to Get Started with Colored Pencils shopping lists.

Are Prismacolors Right for You?

There’s been a lot of back-and-forth about Prismacolor pencils over the last several years. Some artists love them; some hate them. After all the debating, you have only one question. Are Prismacolors right for you or not?

Are Prismacolors Right for You

Last week, I shared reasons you might want to try colored pencils.

This week, it seems appropriate to answer some of the more common questions about Prismacolor pencils, and give you tips for deciding whether or not Prismacolor pencils are right for you.

A Little Bit of History

I always like to provide a little background for discussions like this, because background can provide insight into present day problems. Don’t worry. It’s going to be brief and personal.

I started using Prismacolors back in the 1990s, when they were Berol Prismacolor. There was no better pencil so widely available (in the US at least) and at reasonable prices. They were a high-quality pencil and problems like breaking leads, split casings, and off-center pigment cores were unheard of.

At least I never heard of them.

I had no problems with the pencils. They were perfect for the work I was doing, which was almost exclusively horse portraits.

Sometime since then, Prismacolor changed hands. Berol sold the brand to Sanford, which subsequently sold the brand to Newell-Rubbermaid. Manufacturing changed location and artists began having problems shortly afterward.

I used Prismacolor throughout all those changes, and to be honest, I had very few problems with them.

One batch of Indigo Blue pencils were so gritty I couldn’t use them.

Some pencils did break during sharpening or drawing, and there were a few that broke so much, they were useless.

I did discover (or maybe started noticing is a better way to say it) that quite a few pencils had off-center pigment cores, and I learned still later that sharpening problems often result from off-center cores.

More recently, I started finding pencils that were warped. Fortunately, I usually buy open stock from a local suppler, and learned how to check for warped pencils, so that problem was solved.

But overall, I’ve had relatively few problems with Prismacolor pencils.

Then came the spring of 2017.

The Case of the Fugitive Pencils

Early in 2017, I started hearing a word that aroused concern. Lightfastness. Specifically, the poor lightfast ratings of many Prismacolor pencils.

I believe I mentioned that I was using colored pencils almost exclusively for portraits, right? Portraits people were paying a good amount of money for.
I’d also started doing landscapes, which I hoped to sell.

So it was discouraging (to say the least) to discover that some of my favorite blues and greens, as well as a number of other colors, were fugitve. They faded over time, even in the best conditions.

How permanent were all those portraits I’d created? Would I start hearing from clients about disappearing portraits? It still gives me a twinge of concern thinking those thoughts!

So I went through my pencils, and sorted out all the fugitive colors. The pile of safe colors was almost the same size as the pile of fugitive colors, but I confess I erred on the side of caution. I threw out everything rated III, IV, or V.

I still use the other colors and I still love the way they go onto paper and the effects I can get. I also still miss colors like Sky Blue Light, Light Cerulean Blue, and Limepeel.

But I refuse to use them for anything except sketching and filling in my monthly habit tracker.

All of That to Say This….

What does that mean to you?

It means that what I’m about to say is being said from the standpoint of personal experience. Nothing more, nothing less.

You want to know if it’s safe to use Prismacolor pencils or not, and I’m here to tell you it is.

Depending on what you want to do with your art.

Reasons to Use Prismacolor

So how can you know if Prismacolors are good deal or not?

You Color for Fun and Relaxation

If adult coloring books are your thing, then by all means invest in that full set of Prismacolor pencils.

I don’t do very much in the adult coloring book line—I don’t have much time, to be honest—but I have read plenty of articles about the subject written by artists who do. Almost to the artist, they recommend Prismacolor because of the smooth color lay down, wide variety of colors, reasonable cost, and availability.

Are Prismacolors Right for You - Adult Coloring Pages

I do, too, and for all the same reasons.

In fact, when I doodle with a coloring page, I often use those fugitive colors.

You’re Crafty

You’re making greeting cards, coloring in adult coloring books, or doing crafty things. Color permanence doesn’t concern you.

Color selection, ease of use, and price do.

Prismacolors are probably your best choice. There are over 150 colors altogether. They lay down like a dream, and blend beautifully. You can get them almost anywhere in the United States, and in most cases they’re a good value.

Are Prismacolors Right for You - You're Crafty

They’re also artist-grade, which means pigment quality is high. That means you’ll get a lot more color per pencil than you’d get if you purchased student-grade pencils.

You’re New to Colored Pencils

You think you’ll enjoy them, but you don’t know. You’re not interested—right now—in making art for sale. You just want to draw.

You also don’t want to spend an-arm-and-a-leg on something you may not enjoy.

But you want to try the medium with the best quality tools you can find.

Prismacolor is the answer. They offer students and beginning artists the best combination of quality and value around. Yes there are better pencils, but they’re more expensive.

Are Prismacolors Right for You - You're New to Colored Pencils

And there are cheaper pencils, but they’re lower quality. Even if you get them at a bargain basement price, you may soon find they don’t put much color on the paper or are a struggle to use for other reasons.

Prismacolor is, in my opinion, the only way to go if this describes you.

You Make Fine Art, but Sell Reproductions, Not Originals

The fact of the matter is, you often keep your originals yourself because you like them so much, or you give them to family members or friends. What you sell are reproductions.

Most reproductions are made with lightfast inks, so the lightfastness of the pencils does not matter. At. All.

Use every pencil in the set, lightfast and not-so-lightfast. Get top-notch photographs or scans of the finished pieces, and sell reproductions to your heart’s content!

Then give the original pieces to whomever you like, or hang them on your own walls.

Just make sure to advise friends and family to frame those works of art under UV resistant glass and never, never, NEVER hang the art in direct sunlight.

So Are Prismacolors Right for You?

Prismacolor pencils are perfect for uses like those described above, as well as many others I didn’t touch upon.

By the way, the same applies if you make art mostly to teach others.

In other words, if you don’t care to sell your originals, it doesn’t really matter whether they fade away with time or not. It seems a shame to me to put that kind of time into something that will fade whether you sell it or not, but it’s really up to you, the artist.

Have a question about Prismacolor pencils I didn’t cover? Click here to ask me by email.

Squaring Up Photos in Photoshop

Have you ever wished there was some way of squaring up photos in Photoshop? Especially photos of drawings that you want to use for marketing or your portfolio?

Cheer up! There is!

Squaring Up Photos in Photoshop

One of the more annoying aspects of using the computer for artwork is getting perfectly square photographs. Whether you’re photographing potential subjects or finished paintings, no matter how precise the process or expensive the equipment, distortion will happen.

I know!

I can’t tell you how many photos I have of artwork that aren’t perfectly aligned.

Photograph Your Work so Squaring Up Isn’t Necessary

The best way to deal with this problem is to avoid it altogether. Hang your artwork flat against a wall. Put your camera (or phone) on a tripod, and align it perfectly with the artwork.

Position the camera far enough away from the artwork so you don’t end up with a ‘fish-eye affect.’ A photograph taken with a zoom lens from a short distance almost always turns out better than a photograph taken with a standard lens close to the artwork.

Fill the frame with your artwork, so no background shows around it. This won’t necessarily prevent photographic distortion, but it will help conceal it by eliminating drawing edges. If the camera is properly positioned, distortion should be eliminated.

For small works, consider scanning instead. This is about the only sure way to avoid distortion all the time, and you have the advantage of scanning images at various resolutions. I routinely scan images at between 300 and 600 dots per inch. If the images are very small, I scan them at 1200 dpi. The higher the dpi, the larger the resulting output image.

Squaring Up Photos in Photoshop

But let’s be honest. There are times when you just have to square up a photograph, even after you’ve taken all the best precautions.

Fortunately, the editor and founder of EmptyEasel has written a step-by-step tutorial showing you how to square up photos in Photoshop.

How to “Square Up” Photos of Your Art in Photoshop with Free Transform & Liquify is a great article. I hope you’ll take a moment or two to click over to EmptyEasel.com and give it a read.

Faber-Castell Polychromos Review

I’ve been using them alone and in combination with other pencils long enough! It’s time for my Faber-Castell Polychromos Review.

Faber-Castell Polychromos Review

My New Polychromos Pencils

This spring, my husband purchased a 120-pencil set of Polychromos for me. He was in favor of buying the premium set in the wood box because that’s just the kind of person he is. I was more interested in the pencils themselves, so he agreed to the 120 pencils in the tin. We made our purchase through Dick Blick, but Polychromos are also available from other suppliers, online and off-line.

Faber-Castell Polychromos Review

The pencils arrived well-packaged. The tin itself was enclosed in a cardboard box that I store them in. The tin has actually been out of the box only a few times. Even when I use them, I open the cardboard box, then the tin, then arrange the trays of pencils so they’re all available.

When I’m finished, the tin and box and all gets put away, so the pencils remain in good shape.

The pencils are well-made, and balanced. They feel good in my hand: Solid and straight. They even smell good (for pencils.)

Pigment cores are centered in the wood casing, and so far, I’ve had no problems with breakage.

Polychromos pencils are oil-based, so they’re harder than most wax-based pencils. If you currently use Prismacolor (as I do,) you’ll notice the difference the first time you put a Polychromos to paper.

Lightfastness

Faber-Castell rates their colors on a scale of three. Three stars is best ranking, one star the worst. Of 120 colors, two carry a one-star rating, and sixteen carry a two-star rating. The other 102 colors are all top-rated.

Even better: The rating is printed right on the pencil.

Faber-Castell Polychromos Review 3

Cost

Like many other artists, I’ve always thought of Faber-Castell Polychromos pencils as very expensive. I’m now rethinking that idea.

Yes, Prismacolor pencils are about half the initial purchase price, but if you buy a full set of 150 (retail about $313,) and then toss the fugitive colors (roughly half the colors,) you end up spending $313 for 75 pencils. That calculates to about $4.17 per usable pencil.

A full set of 120 Faber-Castell pencils retails for $323. Even if you discard the poorest rated, you’re still going to have 102 pencils, or $3.17 per pencil.

Faber-Castell Polychromos Review 1

Initial cost is not the only factor. I’ve drawn enough drawings on enough different papers to discover Polychromos go further than Prismacolor.

How much further? I don’t yet know that, but judging by the amount of pencil used and the number of drawings completed, the prognosis is that they’ll last long enough to make the initial investment pay off.

UPDATE: At publishing time, Dick Blick had a full set of Prismacolor for only $72.09. If cost is your primary factor, you won’t be able to beat this price with any other pencil. However, my opinion is that quality control issues and lightfast issues still make Polychromos a better value.

Color Selection

Faber-Castell pencils are available in a total of 120, including a beautiful selection of colors well suited to landscape and animal drawings. The “earthy” greens and blues are ideal for the type of work I do.

There are also enough bright, vibrant colors to satisfy floral artists and others.

Faber-Castell Polychromos Review 2

The only thing I wish there were more browns. Earth tones are among my favorite colors, though, so no matter how many I have, I never have enough!

Performance

If you’ve always used wax-based or soft pencils, Polychromos pencils will feel “scratchy” the first time you use them.

Color lay down is not quite as swift as with softer pencils, but they do hold a point much longer, and—as I already mentioned—you can do more drawing before having to sharpen them.

They blend very well with dry blending methods (colorless blenders, burnishing, tortillions.) I have yet to try blending with paper towel or cloth, but that’s primarily because I’ve been drawing on sanded pastel paper. For that application, a stiff bristle brush is ideal for blending.

And Polychromos excel on sanded pastel paper (more on that in a future post.)

To this point, I’ve used Polychromos pencils in combination with Prismacolor pencils and Koh-I-Nor woodless pencils. All three brands work well together. For best results, use the softer pencils to lay down color more quickly, then draw details with the harder Polychromos pencils. But there really is no “right way” to combine them.

Conclusion

The bottom line is that the Polychromos pencils have done everything I’ve tried to do with them.

Do I recommend them to other artists? Absolutely!

Are they worth the additional cost? Absolutely.

You may not switch to them exclusively, but it’s my opinion that you will not regret giving them a try.

Since I understand budget limitations, buy a few of your favorite colors open stock, or buy some of the smaller sets.

Then do everything with them that you do with whatever brand of pencil you currently use.

Want to Improve Your Colored Pencil Drawings? Try a Drawing Kit!

Want to learn more about drawing with colored pencil, but don’t have the time for an art class or online art course?

Introducing the solution!

A colored pencil drawing kit.

Yorkie Drawing Kit
Colored pencil pro, Gemma Gylling has almost single-handedly made suede board one of the most popular surfaces for drawing animals in colored pencil. Click on image to read more.

Ann Kullberg’s colored pencil drawing kits are the next best thing to taking an online course. I’ve done them for my own instruction and have used them as class projects.

The demonstration pieces are created by colored pencil artists like Gemma Gylling (see the Yorkie at left), Karen Hull (baby portrait below), Anne deMille Flood, and Cynthia Knox.

Kits are available for all levels from first-time artists to advanced artists. It doesn’t matter what your current skill level, you will find a project that suits you and will help you push your skills to the next level.

It doesn’t matter what your favorite subject is, either. Subjects include portraits, pets and animals, florals, landscapes, and still life subjects.

These drawing kits are also a great way to learn new methods. The Yorkie kit featured here shows you how to draw on suede board and includes a piece of suede board.

Interested in drawing on Mylar film or in combining dry pencils and water soluble pencils? There are kits to teach you that, too.

In short, there’s a kit designed to teach you just about anything you want to learn when it comes to drawing with colored pencils! I wish kits like this had been available when I was learning to draw with colored pencils.

Each kit includes:

  • Step by step images
  • Clear instructions
  • A line drawing to transfer
  • A reference photo
  • Drawing paper (not included with digital downloads or in-depth tutorials)

Baby Girl on Black Mat Drawing Kit
Learn how to draw baby skin tones on black mat board. Click on image to read more.

As if that weren’t enough, Ann’s return policy is pretty simple.  If you don’t like your kit, you can return it for an exchange or refund. Pretty simple, isn’t it?

If you want to be a better artist, but are on a limited budget, these drawing kits may be exactly what you’re looking for.

But don’t take my word for it. Browse the collection and see for yourself.

Disclaimer

I am a participant in Ann’s affiliate program. That means that if you follow these links and buy a kit (or anything else), Ann will pay me a commission. For more information on how that works, read my Affiliate Information page. If you choose to do so, thank you very much!

If you prefer, you can go directly to Ann’s website and make your purchase that way. The choice is yours.

No matter how you purchase one of these kits, you will benefit and your drawing will be better.

Colored Pencil Recommendations Bruynzeel Design

A few weeks ago, I shared a few tips for for repairing broken Prismacolor pencils.

The discussion led to another question:

I don’t want to mess with fixing broken pencils. What other brands of pencils are available?

The good news is that there are dozens of high-quality pencils to choose from.

The bad news is that most of them are more expensive than Prismacolor and some of them are more difficult to get. I’ve already shared a video review of Caran d’ache Luminance Pencils and a comparison of Faber-Castell Polychromos and Caran d’ache Luminance. If you haven’t watched those videos, give them a look. You may need go no further.

Today, I’m highlighting another brand of pencils with a video review.

Artist’s Caveat

I haven’t used these pencils so my recommendations are based on the fact that I’ve used other products by the same company or have talked to other artists whose judgment I trust. These pencils were on my To Buy List. Yes, I said were; more on that in a minute.

Now, for the review.

Bruynzeel Design Colored Pencils

A very long time ago, I purchased a set of Bruynzeel Full Color Colored Pencils. That was back in the day when I didn’t know much about how colored pencils were made or the differences between scholastic, student, and artist grade pencils.

I loved those pencils. Color went onto paper smoothly and with very little wax build up. I didn’t have a very big set because they were expensive, but they mixed well with the Prismacolor pencils I was also using. I remember thinking that if I ever stopped using Prismacolor pencils, I’d use these instead.

Unfortunately, that line of pencils was discontinued.

Bruynzeel now produces Design Colored Pencils. Are they the same pencil renamed? I’ve wondered about that, but don’t know for sure.

A Few Interesting Facts

From DickBlick.com: The 3.7 mm wide-gauge, perfectly centered, and double-glued colored cores combine with the finest light cedar casings to make Bruynzeel Design Colored Pencils very resistant to breakage and a joy to sharpen. A balanced color range, with matching pigments between the colored pencil and watercolor pencil ranges, in addition to subtle color release and incredible lightfastness, make them a top choice for the discerning graphic artist, fine artist, designer, illustrator, or hobbyist.

The largest set contains only 24 pencils, even though there are a total of fifty colors available.

The pigment core is thinner than many other pencils—3.7mm versus 3.8 or 3.9. Personally, a thinner core is helpful in creating finer detail and/or for smaller work.

I checked prices at Dick Blick.com (my go-to online source for art supplies). The 12-pencil set lists at $19.95 and the 24-pencil set is $39.46. Pencils are available in open stock for $1.69 each unless you buy twelve or more. The bulk price is $1.52 each.

For more, check out this review.

Would I Buy These Pencils?

They appear to be a step above average in quality, but according to the above review, are not on a par with other pencils in the same price range. The last time I bought open stock Prismacolor soft core pencils, I paid about the same price that Dick Blick is charging for these.

I also had good success with the Fullcolor pencils and have saved even the stubs, though they’re years old.

However…

Bruynzeel-Sakura claims the pencils are  made in the Netherlands, but they are actually manufactured in China under the guidance of Bruynzeel.

The less than honest disclosures about where the pencils are actually made is a problem for me and negates the price and quality issues to some extent. Is it enough make me look elsewhere? That’s why I’ve taken them off my list of pencils to buy.

Does that mean you shouldn’t give them a try?

No. That decision is yours entirely. If you do—or if you already use them—let us know what you think of them.

Product Update

2017.05.06: In October 2016, Brunyzeel-Sakura was acquired by Royal Talens. I don’t yet know how that will affect the quality of Bruynzeel Design colored pencils or any of the other products under the Bruynzeel-Sakura name.

In response to a reader question, I have contacted Royal Talens about getting lightfast information, and will let you know what I learn.

Royal Talens Website

Bruynzeel (Official Website)

Bruynzeel Design Pencils at Dick Blick

What Do You Want to Know?

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