How Can I Contribute to this Blog?

How Can I Contribute to this Blog?

Back in January, I published a survey asking readers what they most wanted to learn this year. The most surprising question was “How can I contribute to this blog?”

At first, I wasn’t sure how to respond. That’s why it’s taken six weeks to post a reply.

But then I started thinking about all the other artists who have contributed to the blog in one way or another.

How Can I Contribute to this Blog?

There are a number of ways readers and artists can help provide content for this blog.

For example, Peggy Osborne has written a number of free, on-line tutorials for the blog. Subjects include dogs, cats, and a horse or two.

Jana Botkin has also written a couple of guest posts on topics ranging from using colored pencils to draw outdoors to dealing with carpal tunnel syndrome as an artist.

Other artists have also contributed content as guest bloggers. So this isn’t a new idea.

A Few Ideas for You

I guess the short answer is that you can contribute to this blog in whatever way works best for you. Here are a few ideas off the top of my head.

Step-by-step Tutorials

Readers love tutorials. Projects they can do in a few days are wonderful, but more in-depth tutorials are also a good fit.

Articles

If you have an interesting art-related background, incident or event you’d like to share, a blog post is the way to go. You could write about an especially difficult challenge you faced and how you overcame it.

You could also write about an exhibit or art fair experience, or something similar.

Disasters Turned Blessings

Have you ever tried a new tool, new paper, or new technique that you thought was the answer to a problem, only to discover it was a disaster?

Did that disaster later become a blessing in disguise?

We artists are always trying things that don’t always work out. We’d love to hear how you turned those results into learning tools to advance your own artwork.

How can I contribute to this blog
Your Art Journey

I don’t know about you, but I’m always motivated to keep going after reading about the trials and triumphs of other artists. Seeing how others cope with difficult problems (like Jana Botkin’s carpal tunnel syndrome) also helps other artists keep drawing.

Don’t think your story is too plain to encourage anyone. Not everyone has a stunning story to tell, but we can all learn from each other.

Leaving Comments

The last way to contribute that I’ll mention here is by leaving comments. Great information has been left in the comment sections. The people who take the time to leave comments are sharing their expertise and ideas just as much as I do when I write these posts.

So even if you never contribute a guest post, you can be a “guest blogger” by leaving your comments!

How to Contribute

The short answer to the question that began this post is that there are lots of ways readers and artists can contribute to this blog. I’ve listed only a few.

I’m always looking for artists who love using colored pencils and also enjoy writing, and who would like to contribute content to this blog.

If that describes you, take a little time to look at some of the posts on this blog. Does one of them give you an idea for an article? Then read the writer’s guidelines here.

You can also contact me. I’m always happy to discuss ideas.

Got a question? Ask Carrie!

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One comment

  1. I may have missed the comment section regarding ideas for the ACEO cards and I just wanted to share this idea…
    How about “illuminated letters” as a topic? We’ve all seen the amount of work that can go into these beautiful images that have been created to grace the pages of historic manuscripts including the modern designs of today.

    The ACEO card size is ideal for a persons first name initial on the portrait format or first and last initials on the landscape format. A person could elect to use one of the thousands of fonts available or design their own hand drawn font.

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