Blending Colored Pencils with OMS

Blending colored pencils with OMS (odorless mineral spirits) is one of my three most frequently used blending methods. In today’s reader question, Patsy asks how to use odorless mineral spirits. Here’s the question:

I would like to know more about using OMS. I seem to make mud. I try using less, smaller brush, maybe not enough layers? Help!

Thank you, Patsy. How-to questions are always good questions. If one person asks, there are usually dozens of others who want to know the same thing, but haven’t asked. Well done!

There’s more than one way to blend with odorless mineral spirits (OMS,) and I’ve already written a tutorial on the subject. You can read that here.

Blending Colored Pencils with Odorless Mineral Spirits

I don’t think the problem is with the size of brush you use, although it is usually a good idea to use the largest brush possible for whatever area you want to blend. The reason is that you can cover the area more quickly, and that’s important because solvents can dry so quickly.

Tips for Blending Colored Pencils with OMS

Let me start with a few general suggestions for blending colored pencils with OMS, and then I’ll address the issue of mud.

Tip #1: Use the Right Paper

Any time you use odorless mineral spirits to blend colored pencil, you need to make sure you’re using a paper that can stand up to the moisture.

That doesn’t have to mean you use watercolor paper, but watercolor papers—and especially hot press watercolor papers—are great for blending colored pencils with odorless mineral spirits.

I often use 140lb hot press watercolor paper such as Canson L’Aquarelle or Stonehenge Aqua when I plan to blend with solvents. Watercolor paper stands up to moisture much better, and both of these papers have a tooth similar to drawing paper, so they’re perfect for colored pencils and solvent blending.

So are sanded art papers, although you need to adjust how to you blend when you use any sanded art paper.

Rigid supports (papers mounted to a rigid support) are also usually okay to use with odorless mineral spirits.

Believe it or not, regular Stonehenge papers perform well with limited amounts of wet blending. I’ve even used watercolor pencils on Stonehenge. Tape it securely to a rigid backboard first and it dries perfectly flat.

Tip #2: Put Enough Pigment on the Paper

Odorless mineral spirits work by breaking down the binder in colored pencil. The binder is what holds the pigment together, so when it’s broken down, the pigments can be blended almost just like mixing paint.

But you must have enough pigment on the paper before you blend. There isn’t a certain number of layers because a lot depends on how heavily you apply the color in the first place. If you use light pressure, you’ll probably need five or six layers before odorless mineral spirits will do any good.

If you tend to draw with heavier pressure, you can blend after fewer layers.

Tip #3: Use Less Odorless Mineral Spirits Each Time You Blend

The standard procedure with solvent blending is to do the first blend with a wet brush, then use a slightly drier brush with each successive blend.

Each subsequent time you blend an area, use less odorless mineral spirits. That way you’re not blending down to the paper each time (which can cause mud.) Keep a paper towel handy and after the second or third blending, blot your brush after picking up OMS and before touching it to paper.

In other words, the more often you blend a particular area, the less odorless mineral spirits you should need.

Now, to the matter of mud!

How to Avoid Mud when Blending Colored Pencils with OMS

All artists who have made art for any length of time have experienced mud. Mud is what happens when your beautiful colors suddenly lose all that vibrancy and turn into some colorless, dull, drab thing. It’s called mud for the very simple reason that the resulting color so often is mud-colored!

Image by Simon Steinberger from Pixabay

How to Make Mud

Mud often happens when complementary colors are mixed together. Complementary colors are those colors that appear opposite one another on the color wheel. Yellow and purple are complements. So are red and green, and blue and orange.

Complementary colors tone down each other. They’re a great way to keep a color from getting too vivid. If you want to tone down greens in a landscape, add a touch of red.

But usually, you need only a little bit of the complement to tone down the color. A little bit of red in a landscape green is good. A lot of red in a landscape green and you end up with mud.

Mud also happens when you mix too many colors together. That happened to me a lot when I was oil painting because it’s so frightfully easy to keep adding different colors on a mixing palette.

But you can do it with colored pencils, too.

How to Avoid Mud

Without knowing specifics about what is happening to with your blending, Patsy, my guess is that you’re blending too many different colors together or that you’re blending complementary colors.

Try layering a few layers of one color, then blending with odorless mineral spirits. After that’s dry, layer the next color, then blend that. Remember to use less solvent with each blend, so you don’t also blend the colors underneath. This should give you more of a glazing effect, and should result in cleaner color so long as you avoid complements or near-complements and layering too many colors.

One other thing to watch for is a dirty brush. Rinse your brush between uses by blotting it on a clean paper towel until it no longer leaves color no the paper towel. Any color on the brush when you blend will dirty the color already on the paper.

And finally, don’t use dirty solvent. You can use solvent if there is sediment on the bottom of the container; just don’t stir it up. If there is sediment at the bottom, it’s better to carefully pour off the clean solvent, then dispose of the remainder.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *