Afternoon Graze, Original Colored Pencil Landscape, April 13, 2013
Afternoon Graze
8×10 Colored Pencil
Bristol 146 lb. Regular Surface, White

The end is near on this landscape drawing. The remaining work falls into two categories:

  • Finish the horse
  • Fine tune and adjust the overall drawing

This week, we’ll finish the horse, then wrap things up next week.

Final work on the chestnut began with a glaze of Terra Cotta over the shadows using light to medium pressure with a sharp pencil and whatever strokes best suited the shapes and contours. I added a minimum of two layers, refining and building detail, adjusting edges as necessary and revealing the highlights by adding darker colors and values around them.

Next, I used Indigo Blue to darken the shadows. Beginning with a needle sharp pencil, I started with the near side hind leg and worked upward and forward.

At the head, I added the first color to the eye and the shadows around the eye using a variety of strokes and light pressure.

Then I stroked in the beginnings of a cast shadow around the chestnut with upward moving strokes and medium pressure.

For both areas (horse and cast shadow), I kept the pencil well sharpened.

I next layered Orange over all of the horse except the brightest highlights, which I carefully outlined and worked around. A second layer of Orange was added to the shadows with light pressure and directional strokes working around the contours of the body.

Pumpkin Orange was then layered over the shadows. I continued using directional strokes and light pressure, but used a blunter pencil. The blunter tip produced wider strokes with softer edges and made it easier to soften the edges between highlights and middle tones.

Afternoon Graze, Original Colored Pencil Landscape, April 16, 2013

 

I glazed Sienna Brown over all of the horse except the highlights. In the shadows, I applied two or three layers. In the middle tones, I applied one or two layers, and in the lighter middle tones, a single layer.

Next, Jasmine was layered over all but the brightest highlights, which I left white. Orange was applied into the middle tones to blend the darker highlights and lighter middle tones. Light pressure was used with both colors.

Then I glazed Orange over all the rest of the horse (except the tail) with medium pressure to unify the color.

Afternoon Graze, Original Colored Pencil Landscape, April 17, 2013

 

The chestnut is beginning to look finished, so I did a test burnishing with the colorless blender to see if burnishing was all that was needed.

I burnished the shadows of both off side legs, then burnished the middle tones and highlights with Lemon Yellow to and burnished the highlights a second time with White. The result wasn’t satisfactory, however, so I’m not quite finished with color application.

I layered Dark Brown into the darkest of the shadows, using a blunt pencil to get a wider, softer stroke, and heavy pressure (not quite burnishing) to apply color to the dark shadows. For the most part, I worked in directional strokes following the contours of the muscle groups and bone structure, but in some places, I also layered strokes in other directions to fill in paper holes.

I followed up with Dark Green with heavy pressure in the dark shadows on the lower surfaces and Copenhagen Blue with medium pressure in the dark shadows on the upper surfaces. Since the blues are in lighter areas, I used a sharper pencil and more open strokes.

Afternoon Graze, Original Colored Pencil Landscape, April 18, 2013

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