Welcome to the final “class” in this series about creating a miniature drawing with colored pencils. I hope you’ve enjoyed it, whether you worked on your own drawing or not.

If you missed any of the previous posts or would like to read them again, links are at the bottom.

I’ve also included a list of the supplies I used for this project, so if you’re interested in doing the same type of artwork, that information is available.

Now, on to finishing this miniature drawing.

How to Draw a Horse in Miniature With Colored Pencils - Finishing the Drawing

 

I’ll be working on both the horse and the background this week. That’s standard operating procedure for any drawing and a necessary part of finishing: Making sure all the parts and pieces of the composition work well together.

Finishing the Background

I added more color layers to the background with Prismacolor Soft Core Dark Green, Olive Green, Indigo Blue, Apple Green, Dark Umber, and Yellow Chartreuse. Light colors were applied in light areas and darks in dark areas, but I overlapped light colors and dark colors enough to avoid value patterns that looked “pasted on”.

Next, I used Yellow Chartreuse, Chartreuse, Light Green, Apple Green, Deco Yellow, and French Grey 30% to burnish the background. I burnished light areas with lighter colors and dark areas with darker colors, but once again overlapped lights and darks.

The result was a deep and rich color field that looked almost like it could have been an oil painting. No paper holes remained in the work. If you like paper holes or at least don’t mind them, you don’t need to burnish.

How to Draw a Horse in Miniature With Colored Pencils - Finishing the Drawing 1

 

Finishing the Horse

I used Prismacolor Verithin Goldenrod, Orange Ochre, and Terra Cotta to apply color throughout the horse’s head, neck, and shoulder. I didn’t use the colors in a particular order and worked back and forth among them.

Color was applied in directional strokes that either mimicked hair growth patterns or followed the contours of the body. Sometimes, I alternated between those two stroke types to get good color coverage.

I kept the pressure light to medium throughout (4 to 6) and I kept the pencils as sharp as possible in order to get the best possible coverage without filling up the paper’s tooth.

How to Draw a Horse in Miniature With Colored Pencils - Finishing the Drawing 2

 

I then added Spanish Orange, Crimson Red, Orange, Peacock Green, Black, and Non-Photo Blue to the mix to deepen the red bay colors and adjust light and dark values.

When I had done all I thought I could do with Verithin pencils, I switched to Prismacolor Soft Core Burnt Ochre, Orange, and Black.

For the most part, I used a medium to heavy pressure, really forcing color down into the tooth of the paper to fill up every last space.

How to Draw a Horse in Miniature With Colored Pencils - Finishing the Drawing 3

 

Final Touches

Finishing the drawing was a matter of doing what I’d already done over and over. Adding as many rounds of color as necessary to get the image where I wanted it to be.

I continued to mix Verithin and Prismacolor pencils in Goldenrod, Orange Ochre, Crimson Red, Ultramarine, Orange, Canary Yellow, and White (the last two colors were highlight and/or burnishing colors). They were followed by Prismacolor Burnt Ochre applied in light to medium pressure.

How to Draw a Horse in Miniature With Colored Pencils - Finishing the Drawing 4

If You Want to Follow Along

If you want to follow this demonstration with your own drawing, here are the materials I used. Colors are listed in the order I used them for each part of the drawing.

  • Rising Stonehenge paper, 90lb, white cut to 3-1/2″ by 2-1/2″ (if you want to do an ACEO)
  • Graphite pencil, 2B or softer, to shade the back of the drawing for transfer. Any non-greasy transfer paper will also work.
  • Umber Under Drawing
    • Prismacolor Verithin Dark Umber pencil. I use Verithin pencils for the first stages of most drawings because they have a thinner, harder pigment core. That means they hold a point much longer and they make a thinner mark. They also contain less wax binder, so they don’t fill the tooth of the paper quite as much.
  • Adding Color to the Background
    • Verithin Pencils
      • Dark Umber
      • Goldenrod
      • Terra Cotta
      • Apple Green
      • Grass Green
      • Olive Green
      • Peacock Green
      • True Green
      • Canary Yellow
      • True Blue
      • Non-Photo Blue
      • Ultramarine
    • Prismacolor Soft Core Pencils
      • Apple Green (light areas)
      • Dark Green (dark areas)
      • Peacock Green (blending color)
      • Chartreuse (blending color)
      • Light Green (blending color)
      • Indigo Blue (blending color)
      • Yellow Chartreuse (burnishing)
      • Chartreuse (burnishing)
      • Light Green (burnishing)
      • Apple Green (burnishing)
      • Deco Yellow (burnishing)
      • French Grey 30% (burnishing)
  • Adding Color to the Horse
    • Verithin Pencils
      • Goldenrod (light areas)
      • Orange (middle values/base color)
      • Orange Ochre (middle values/base color)
      • Indigo Blue (dark areas and blacks)
      • Terra Cotta
      • Dark Brown
      • Crimson Red
    • Prismacolor Soft Core
      • Burnt Ochre
      • Orange
      • Black

 

Other Articles in This Series

How to Draw a Horse in Miniature With Colored Pencils

How to Draw a Horse in Miniature With Colored Pencils – Adding Color to the Background

How to Draw a Horse in Miniature With Colored Pencils – Adding Color to the Horse